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Mamoru Hosoda's 'Mirai' Comes To UK Cinemas This November

Anime auteur Mamoru Hosoda's latest Mirai received its world premiere at this year's Cannes Festival, to rapturous reviews and a standing ovation. It is also due to play at Annecy next month. Which is all well and good, you say, but when will the rest of us get to see it?

Anime Limited has now confirmed that the film will be coming to screens in the UK on November 2.  However, we'd not be surprised if the film screens before that at London Film Festival, Scotland Loves Anime, and possibly some other festivals too. A website has launched, where you can register to be notified when tickets are available.

Mirai is a sci-fi/fantasy tale about a four-year-old boy called Kun, who feels jealous of his new baby sister, Mirai. Until, that is he somehow encounters an older version of his sister, and sets off on a magical adventure through time and space.

Here's the offical synopsis:



The birth of a sibling is a joyous time for many, but not for
Kun. Four years old and spoilt rotten, he sees the arrival
of baby sister Mirai as competition for his parents’ love.
That is, until magical encounters with an older Mirai and
family past, present and future send the siblings on an
intimate journey through time and space, to confront
Kun’s uncertain feelings and prepare him to become the
big brother he needs to be



Combining themes of his past films The Girl Who Leapt Through Time, Summer Wars and Wolf Children, it promises to be a moving and magical experience for both Hosoda fans and newcomers. Inspired by his own family, it looks like this will strike a chord with audiences the world over.

Mirai will also be released in the United States by GKIDS Film later this year- although the exact date is still to be announced.

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